Do We have Ethical and Aesthetic Obligations to Respect Landscapes?, by Isis Brook

Traditionally we have thought of ethical obligations as placing constraints on our behaviour towards other humans and, later, sentient animals. With the rise of environmental ethics these obligations were re-examined and in some cases broadened to include living entities and/or communities such as ecosystems or species. However, that broadening – when focused on the intrinsic…

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Landscape Aesthetics: in relation to nature and culture, by Marie Ulber

While people nowadays mostly live in built environments we may ask ourselves: How do we perceive natural landscapes? The starting point of this discussion is that our environment and our way of life in the western world have changed rapidly over the last decades. First, our perception has become used to new sources of imagery such as…

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Differences in Landscape Appreciation in Pilot Study of Place Attachment and Collective, by Julia Sulina

Does everybody perceive and appreciate same landscapes and places? If not, can social psychology aspects of collective identity be used to define those differences or similarities between cultural groups? Paper aims to answer these questions by results of pilot qualitative study of place attachment and collective identity. Aesthetics and ethics of the environment is hided…

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Ethics from the Ground Up/Ethics Being Ground Up, by Michael King

For much of philosophy, the field of ethics concerned human affairs with no substantive consideration of the land. It was not until the 20th Century that ethical systems were developed and codified with respect to the land and the environment: Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic, Arne Naess’ Deep Ecology, and Murray Bookchin’s radical ecology being a few…

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Body and Intellect: the ethical-educative traits of landscape gardening in contemporary art, by Tunde Varga

As Dipesh Chakrabarti has pointed out (2009) the Viconian separation of nature and culture does no longer hold in an age when humanity becomes a geological agent by its very number. The probable collapse of the natural history – human history distinction (in which nature was seen only a timeless backdrop to human activity) thus requires not only…

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“Listen, a wind died. Do you not realize that we are gardeners and not flowers?”, by Moirika Reker

There is today an overall excessive amount of stuff. The world is crowded with images, objects and constructions. This visual excessiveness adds to the ecological time-bomb we’ve arrived at and the devastation of the natural world. How is an artist, a planner, an architect to go on producing visual work? An ethical practice has to have as basis a…

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Are Toxins Evil?: ethics and affects (a video-essay), by Trine Riel

[vimeo 43188558 w=500 h=375] ARE TOXINS EVIL? from Serious Life on Vimeo. ‘Indeed they seem to think of man in Nature as a state within a state, thus they believe that man rather disrupts than follows the order of nature and that he has absolute power over his actions and is not defined by anything…

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Seeing Ethically: beauty and morality in Victorian ideas about nature, by Amy Woodson-Boulton

As I argue in my forthcoming book, Transformative Beauty: Art Museums in Industrial Britain (Stanford, spring 2012), a number of Victorian municipal governments created art museums as a direct response to the perceived moral and physical ugliness of industrial capitalism. They could do so because reformers understood beauty – that is, the experience of beauty through…

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From the Visual to the Aesthetic, by Daniel Coombes

An effort is being made to situate architecture and landscape architecture within an ethical trajectory that has contemporary currency. Certain proponents of both disciplines are proposing that an ethical practice may emerge through attempting to align the way we approach design with the dynamics of the human and nonhuman processes already operating within a particular…

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Resilient Places?: the restorative paradigm and Maggie’s Centre Gardens, by Angie MacDonald

The idea that a garden can be a space for transformation is embedded within ancient and modern ideas of the restorative garden. This paper argues that a garden can be not merely a healthy but a ‘resilient place’ embracing a dynamic and inclusive relationship between humans and the natural world and one that can evoke sensory memories and…

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